Essay On How Poverty Can Be Eradicated

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Lant Pritchett of Harvard Kennedy School, a former World Bank economist, notes that by this logic, the world could eliminate extreme poverty for about $45 billion a year, or roughly the amount spent on movie tickets annually worldwide. It’s not development.” He says that the billions who live on a bit more than $1.25 a day are still deeply impoverished by any reasonable standard.

Of course, making it above the $1.25-a-day mark doesn’t guarantee a white picket fence and a Caddy in the driveway — indeed it doesn’t even guarantee a proper meal. “Why are we focused on a line, above which nothing happens, set by some technocrats in Washington?

Back in Washington, while Kim delivered a sunny forecast for the developing world based on the premise that growth would continue, his counterpart at the I. F., Christine Lagarde, seemed stuck talking about problems — in particular, the economic malaise of the richest countries on Earth. “The developing world has gotten its act together,” Birdsall says.

Would the Bank of Japan’s plan to end deflation by bathing the economy in yen work?

“This is the global target to end poverty.”It sounds like the sort of airy, ambitious goal that is greeted by standing ovations but is ultimately unlikely to ever materialize. The end of extreme poverty might very well be within reach.

“It’s not by any means pie-in-the-sky,” says Scott Morris, who formerly managed the Obama administration’s relations with development institutions.Cities bolster access to health services and public resources; infant-mortality rates, for instance, are 40 percent lower in urban Cambodia than in rural Cambodia.And workers themselves become more productive, often by making the switch from labor-intensive work like farming to capital-intensive work like manufacturing.In the early 1980s, East Asia had the highest extreme-poverty rate in the world, with more than three in four people living on less than

“It’s not by any means pie-in-the-sky,” says Scott Morris, who formerly managed the Obama administration’s relations with development institutions.

Cities bolster access to health services and public resources; infant-mortality rates, for instance, are 40 percent lower in urban Cambodia than in rural Cambodia.

And workers themselves become more productive, often by making the switch from labor-intensive work like farming to capital-intensive work like manufacturing.

In the early 1980s, East Asia had the highest extreme-poverty rate in the world, with more than three in four people living on less than $1.25 a day. But other middle-income countries, like Brazil, Nigeria and India, have experienced significant growth, too — in no small part because tens of millions of the very poor have moved from rural areas to cities, where they become richer, healthier and more productive for their economies.

Since 1980, the proportion of the developing world living in urban areas has grown to about 50 percent, from 30 percent, and according to the World Bank, that migration of hundreds of millions has been instrumental in pulling down poverty rates — and will be for a broader set of countries going forward.

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“It’s not by any means pie-in-the-sky,” says Scott Morris, who formerly managed the Obama administration’s relations with development institutions.Cities bolster access to health services and public resources; infant-mortality rates, for instance, are 40 percent lower in urban Cambodia than in rural Cambodia.And workers themselves become more productive, often by making the switch from labor-intensive work like farming to capital-intensive work like manufacturing.In the early 1980s, East Asia had the highest extreme-poverty rate in the world, with more than three in four people living on less than $1.25 a day. But other middle-income countries, like Brazil, Nigeria and India, have experienced significant growth, too — in no small part because tens of millions of the very poor have moved from rural areas to cities, where they become richer, healthier and more productive for their economies.Since 1980, the proportion of the developing world living in urban areas has grown to about 50 percent, from 30 percent, and according to the World Bank, that migration of hundreds of millions has been instrumental in pulling down poverty rates — and will be for a broader set of countries going forward.Given how big the world is, how big the goal is and how diverse economies are, it would take a multipronged approach, he said.For parts of sub-Saharan Africa, it would mean huge electrification projects.Extreme poverty in sub-Saharan Africa has at last dipped below the 50 percent mark.Still, many within the development world doubt the ability of NGOs to cure the world’s most troubled nations of their woes.When I asked Jeffrey Sachs, the development economist, if the target seemed feasible, he said, “I absolutely believe so.” And Nancy Birdsall, president of the Center for Global Development, the powerful Washington policy group, told me, “In many ways, it’s a very modest goal.”In part, this is because the bar is set very low.The World Bank aims to raise just about everyone on Earth above the $1.25-a-day income threshold.

.25 a day. But other middle-income countries, like Brazil, Nigeria and India, have experienced significant growth, too — in no small part because tens of millions of the very poor have moved from rural areas to cities, where they become richer, healthier and more productive for their economies.Since 1980, the proportion of the developing world living in urban areas has grown to about 50 percent, from 30 percent, and according to the World Bank, that migration of hundreds of millions has been instrumental in pulling down poverty rates — and will be for a broader set of countries going forward.Given how big the world is, how big the goal is and how diverse economies are, it would take a multipronged approach, he said.For parts of sub-Saharan Africa, it would mean huge electrification projects.Extreme poverty in sub-Saharan Africa has at last dipped below the 50 percent mark.Still, many within the development world doubt the ability of NGOs to cure the world’s most troubled nations of their woes.When I asked Jeffrey Sachs, the development economist, if the target seemed feasible, he said, “I absolutely believe so.” And Nancy Birdsall, president of the Center for Global Development, the powerful Washington policy group, told me, “In many ways, it’s a very modest goal.”In part, this is because the bar is set very low.The World Bank aims to raise just about everyone on Earth above the

“It’s not by any means pie-in-the-sky,” says Scott Morris, who formerly managed the Obama administration’s relations with development institutions.

Cities bolster access to health services and public resources; infant-mortality rates, for instance, are 40 percent lower in urban Cambodia than in rural Cambodia.

And workers themselves become more productive, often by making the switch from labor-intensive work like farming to capital-intensive work like manufacturing.

In the early 1980s, East Asia had the highest extreme-poverty rate in the world, with more than three in four people living on less than $1.25 a day. But other middle-income countries, like Brazil, Nigeria and India, have experienced significant growth, too — in no small part because tens of millions of the very poor have moved from rural areas to cities, where they become richer, healthier and more productive for their economies.

Since 1980, the proportion of the developing world living in urban areas has grown to about 50 percent, from 30 percent, and according to the World Bank, that migration of hundreds of millions has been instrumental in pulling down poverty rates — and will be for a broader set of countries going forward.

||

“It’s not by any means pie-in-the-sky,” says Scott Morris, who formerly managed the Obama administration’s relations with development institutions.Cities bolster access to health services and public resources; infant-mortality rates, for instance, are 40 percent lower in urban Cambodia than in rural Cambodia.And workers themselves become more productive, often by making the switch from labor-intensive work like farming to capital-intensive work like manufacturing.In the early 1980s, East Asia had the highest extreme-poverty rate in the world, with more than three in four people living on less than $1.25 a day. But other middle-income countries, like Brazil, Nigeria and India, have experienced significant growth, too — in no small part because tens of millions of the very poor have moved from rural areas to cities, where they become richer, healthier and more productive for their economies.Since 1980, the proportion of the developing world living in urban areas has grown to about 50 percent, from 30 percent, and according to the World Bank, that migration of hundreds of millions has been instrumental in pulling down poverty rates — and will be for a broader set of countries going forward.Given how big the world is, how big the goal is and how diverse economies are, it would take a multipronged approach, he said.For parts of sub-Saharan Africa, it would mean huge electrification projects.Extreme poverty in sub-Saharan Africa has at last dipped below the 50 percent mark.Still, many within the development world doubt the ability of NGOs to cure the world’s most troubled nations of their woes.When I asked Jeffrey Sachs, the development economist, if the target seemed feasible, he said, “I absolutely believe so.” And Nancy Birdsall, president of the Center for Global Development, the powerful Washington policy group, told me, “In many ways, it’s a very modest goal.”In part, this is because the bar is set very low.The World Bank aims to raise just about everyone on Earth above the $1.25-a-day income threshold.

.25-a-day income threshold.

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