In Search Of Zora Neale Hurston Essay

In Search Of Zora Neale Hurston Essay-36
Shinker said the Hurston books were issued mainly by university presses.But because Hurston’s work appeals equally to white and to African-American audiences, Shinker said, those houses often registered impressive sales.

Shinker said the Hurston books were issued mainly by university presses.But because Hurston’s work appeals equally to white and to African-American audiences, Shinker said, those houses often registered impressive sales.

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According to Alice Walker and Mary Helen Washington, Hurston's career epitomizes the difficulty of being a black woman artist in America: “What did it mean for a black woman to be an artist in our grandmother's time?

” Hurston's life provides an answer, and part of it is, as Miss Walker suggests, “cruel enough to stop the blood.”Hurston was born around 1901 (no one knows for sure) in Eatonville, Fla.

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In a literary lifetime that included novels, essays, short stories and plays, Zora Neale Hurston earned less than $1,000 in royalties.“But by the quality and quantity of her work, she is probably the major undiscovered writer of the 20th Century,” N. In her hometown of Eatonville, Fla., an annual Zora Neale Hurston Festival of the Arts honors her.

A feminist “in the way she lived her life,” Hurston was “married to her work,” Mott said, “wed to her subject matter,” Nathiri agreed.

While later in life she lived in dire poverty, in her early years Hurston supported herself through patronage.Zora Neale Hurston: A Woman and Her Community,” the retrospective from Sentinel Books.Bethany Mott, the marketing director for Sentinel Books, said the Hurston book was inspired in part by an essay written by the late John Hicks, a staff writer for the Orlando Sentinel.Hicks was a great admirer of Hurston’s work, Mott said, and in 1976 wrote a long essay in appreciation of her.Hicks’ essay became the nucleus for the new book, Mott said. ” is the first title “of real national interest” for Sentinel Books, which publishes 10 to 12 books each year. The interest in Hurston, Mott speculated, comes from the fact that “she was such an interesting role model. She went against the trend, and in later life she was a real political conservative.“She was a very complicated woman,” Mott said.This is a digitized version of an article from The Times’s print archive, before the start of online publication in 1996.To preserve these articles as they originally appeared, The Times does not alter, edit or update them.And she did much of her writing in the ‘30s and early ‘40s, after the Harlem Renaissance.“She fell out of favor,” Nathiri said.“African-American writers were less in vogue.” Still, according to Nathiri, the rediscovery of Hurston “is not a recent phenomenon; this revival has certainly been going on about 20 years.”Much of Hurston’s posthumous popularity can be attributed to the growth of women’s studies and Afro-American studies.Eatonville, about five miles outside Orlando, was incorporated in 1887 as the country’s first African-American town.A 114-page retrospective that features photographs, interviews with her family and an essay by Alice Walker was published this year by Orlando’s Sentinel Books, and nearly 50 years after their original publication and 30 years after Hurston’s death, Harper Collins is in the process of reissuing all of Hurston’s works.

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